Bmorenews.com is Baltimore's number one stop for news and information. We feature Baltimore community news, Baltimore business news, Baltimore political news. We also offer live video feeds and a talk radio feed of the Doni Glover show

Subscribe to Receive eNews from bmorenews.com

Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon Sign up for our Email Newsletter
For Email Marketing you can trust
Home > Political News > BALTIMORE: Sheila Dixon Speaks at Stomp the Runway for Autism, An Autism Awareness Fashion Show & Program at Downtown Cultural Arts Center Last Weekend, 9.26.15

BALTIMORE: Sheila Dixon Speaks at Stomp the Runway for Autism, An Autism Awareness Fashion Show & Program at Downtown Cultural Arts Center Last Weekend, 9.26.15

sheila-31
While she is indeed running for Mayor of Baltimore on April 26, 2016, she nonetheless has a heart and sensitivity to the needs of the people. Picture from an autism awareness program on Saturday that opened the community's eyes to autism, the success of some who have it, as well as some of the challenges for parents and caregivers.

See more pics

from Autism Awareness Fashion Show & Program at the Downtown Cultural Arts Center.

________________________________

What is autism?

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a range of complex neurodevelopment disorders, characterized by social impairments, communication difficulties, and restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior.  Autistic disorder, sometimes called autism or classical ASD, is the most severe form of ASD, while other conditions along the spectrum include a milder form known as Asperger syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (usually referred to as PDD-NOS).  Although ASD varies significantly in character and severity, it occurs in all ethnic and socioeconomic groups and affects every age group.  Experts estimate that 1 out of 88 children age 8 will have an ASD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, March 30, 2012).  Males are four times more likely to have an ASD than females.

 


What are some common signs of autism?

The hallmark feature of ASD is impaired social interaction.  As early as infancy, a baby with ASD may be unresponsive to people or focus intently on one item to the exclusion of others for long periods of time.  A child with ASD may appear to develop normally and then withdraw and become indifferent to social engagement.

Children with an ASD may fail to respond to their names and often avoid eye contact with other people.  They have difficulty interpreting what others are thinking or feeling because they can’t understand social cues, such as tone of voice or facial expressions, and don’t watch other people’s faces for clues about appropriate behavior.  They may lack empathy.

Many children with an ASD engage in repetitive movements such as rocking and twirling, or in self-abusive behavior such as biting or head-banging.  They also tend to start speaking later than other children and may refer to themselves by name instead of “I” or “me.”  Children with an ASD don’t know how to play interactively with other children.  Some speak in a sing-song voice about a narrow range of favorite topics, with little regard for the interests of the person to whom they are speaking.

Children with characteristics of an ASD may have co-occurring conditions, including Fragile X syndrome (which causes intellectual disability), tuberous sclerosis, epileptic seizures, Tourette syndrome, learning disabilities, and attention deficit disorder.  About 20 to 30 percent of children with an ASD develop epilepsy by the time they reach adulthood. .

How is autism diagnosed?

ASD varies widely in severity and symptoms and may go unrecognized, especially in mildly affected children or when it is masked by more debilitating handicaps.  Very early indicators that require evaluation by an expert include:

  • no babbling or pointing by age 1
  • no single words by 16 months or two-word phrases by age 2
  • no response to name
  • loss of language or social skills
  • poor eye contact
  • excessive lining up of toys or objects
  • no smiling or social responsiveness.

Later indicators include:

  • impaired ability to make friends with peers
  • impaired ability to initiate or sustain a conversation with others
  • absence or impairment of imaginative and social play
  • stereotyped, repetitive, or unusual use of language
  • restricted patterns of interest that are abnormal in intensity or focus
  • preoccupation with certain objects or subjects
  • inflexible adherence to specific routines or rituals.

    READ MORE

Tags: 9.26.15, An Autism Awareness Fashion Show & Program at Downtown Cultural Arts Center Last Weekend, BALTIMORE: Sheila Dixon Speaks at Stomp the Runway for Autism

Read more from BMORENEWS.COM

sitemap xml

Add bmorenews.com to your web site. Subscribe:

BMORENEWS.com Celebrating 5 Years!!

For MORE political news, community news, business news, entertainment news, commentary, Glover Report, photos, videos, and LIVE! online talk radio covering the black community in the Washington, DC and Baltimore region - the #2 market for African Americans ...

... keep visiting www.BMORENEWS By DMGlobal Communications